Corporate Citizenship Perspectives

The business case for youth mentoring

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on Sep 28, 2016 8:00:00 AM

In the United States, approximately 5.6 million youth between the ages of 16 and 24 are disconnected from school and work, and many are not getting the support they need to drive greater engagement. One in three young people— nearly 16 million— will reach the age of 19 without having ever had a mentor in their life of any kind. These rates are even higher for at-risk youth, who experience higher rates of poverty, limited networks, and under-resourced schools.[1] Research shows that even one positive, consistent, caring, relationship with an adult can offset nearly every risk factor in a young person’s life and improve their chances of success.

Today, companies of all sizes are recognizing the role they can play in filling this “mentorship gap” and have simultaneously discovered that they can use mentorship programs to realize both business and corporate responsibility goals. According to the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship’s most recent Community Involvement Study, companies consistently rank youth programs as one of the most important social issues addressed through their community involvement efforts (See Figure A).

Mentoring_Figure_A.jpg

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Topics: Management, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Business Case, Youth, Return on Investment (ROI)

Case Study: Aligning workplace giving, corporate philanthropy, and volunteering at KPMG

Posted by Colleen Olphert, Director, Membership and Member Services on Dec 23, 2015 7:20:00 AM

The following is excerpted from the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship’s most recent research report, the Community Involvement Study 2015. KPMG_Corporate_Giving.jpgTo learn more about corporate giving, consider joining us for Corporate Giving: An Introduction to Corporate and Foundation Giving

To most effectively address social issues through community involvement efforts, many companies take a holistic approach, developing efforts that work in tandem to achieve the greatest possible business and social value. Workplace giving efforts are an important component of these efforts, and are often used by companies to augment the more traditional corporate giving and volunteer initiatives.

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Topics: Volunteer, Giving, Corporate Community Involvement, Youth

Fostering a more promising and productive future through mentorship programs

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on Jan 19, 2015 9:00:00 AM

Mentoring-079109-editedIn 1897, Andrew Carnegie, the industrialist credited with leading the enormous expansion of the American steel industry, appointed the 35-year-old Charles M. Schwab as his successor as president of Carnegie Steel. Schwab had started as a low level engineer at the company and first impressed Carnegie with his talents as a pianist at a party. This jump-started a close mentoring relationship between the two, and in a relatively brief period of time, Schwab was groomed to follow Carnegie as head of the company. Schwab’s business success even after he left Carnegie Steel is largely credited to Carnegie’s interest in his high-potential protégé.
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Topics: Volunteer, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Leadership, Youth, Education, Involvement

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