Corporate Citizenship Perspectives

Ecosystems create value

Posted by Katherine V. Smith, Executive Director on Apr 5, 2017 1:30:13 PM

On Monday, March 27, I had the pleasure of welcoming more than 550 CSR professionals to the Center’s 2017 International Corporate Citizenship Conference, and had the opportunity to share my thoughts on the event’s theme: Corporate Citizenship Ecosystems. Below you can find a video and a transcript excerpting my remarks:

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Topics: Corporate Citizenship, Partnerships, Responsible Corporate Leadership, Value of Corporate Citizenship

Tracking progress toward environmental sustainability goals

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on Feb 24, 2017 10:04:02 AM

Today’s companies face substantial pressure from stakeholders—both internal and external—to monitor and report on a variety of environmental metrics. The benefits to the company are clear, as research shows that successfully managing a company’s environmental footprint can strengthen a firm’s financial performance[i], help them maintain that performance over the long term[ii], improve the company’s image,[iii] and identify and mitigate potential risks to operations.[iv]

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Topics: Environment, Sustainability Reporting, Value of Corporate Citizenship

Corporate Citizen Magazine Issue 18: Data Make Meaning

Posted by Patricia MacKenzie, Director of Marketing & Communications on Oct 14, 2016 8:56:54 AM

The Fall 2016 issue of the Corporate Citizen Magazine, "Data Make Meaning," is now available!

TabletwithIssue18.jpgIn this issue, you'll learn about companies that are collecting and using data to create innovative programs, address social and environmental issues, and measure and report on their progress.

Highlights include:

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Topics: Corporate Citizenship, Partnerships, Reporting, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Data Protection

The business case for youth mentoring

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on Sep 28, 2016 8:00:00 AM

In the United States, approximately 5.6 million youth between the ages of 16 and 24 are disconnected from school and work, and many are not getting the support they need to drive greater engagement. One in three young people— nearly 16 million— will reach the age of 19 without having ever had a mentor in their life of any kind. These rates are even higher for at-risk youth, who experience higher rates of poverty, limited networks, and under-resourced schools.[1] Research shows that even one positive, consistent, caring, relationship with an adult can offset nearly every risk factor in a young person’s life and improve their chances of success.

Today, companies of all sizes are recognizing the role they can play in filling this “mentorship gap” and have simultaneously discovered that they can use mentorship programs to realize both business and corporate responsibility goals. According to the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship’s most recent Community Involvement Study, companies consistently rank youth programs as one of the most important social issues addressed through their community involvement efforts (See Figure A).

Mentoring_Figure_A.jpg

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Topics: Management, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Business Case, Youth, Return on Investment (ROI)

Continual improvement at Dogeared: For the business and the community

Posted by Colleen Olphert, Director, Membership and Member Services on Sep 12, 2016 3:37:00 PM

The following is excerpted from Issue 15 of The Corporate Citizen. To learn more about how you can engage your employees and contribute to your communities by developing a strategic corporate citizenship plan, consider joining us in Chicago on September 13-15, 2017, and in Los Angeles on February 7-9, 2018 for our Corporate Citizenship Strategy: Connect to Your Business and Community course.

For companies with a smaller operational footprint—even though they may have national or even global brand exposure—great value can be achieved by developing a foundational ethos, applying that mission to every aspect of business, from design through delivery, and incorporating it into community involvement strategy.

Founded in 1991 by Marcia Maizel-Clarke and Merlin Clarke, Dogeared, a global accessories brand that focuses on handcrafted jewelry, was built on the premise of community. The company sources the majority of products and materials locally from vendors around the Los Angeles area. Local artisans handcraft all of the company’s unique charms, and jewels are designed and assembled on-site in their Southern California studio.

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Topics: Partnerships, Member Spotlight, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Strategy, Reputation, Culture, Brand

Data philanthropy: The high-tech future of social impact

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on Aug 30, 2016 10:36:25 AM

Modern businesses use data primarily for competitive advantage—to give their customers the best experience, to gain entry into new markets, to become faster, smarter, better. Whether they are gathering data on their customers’ purchasing habits or planning flight patterns, companies are collecting more detailed information than ever.

How this information is collected, stored, and used is a growing area of corporate citizenship focus. As reported in the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship’s 2014 State of Corporate Citizenship, nearly 80 percent of executives consider consumer data protection and privacy to be a top corporate citizenship priority (see Figure A).

SOCC-Figure16.jpg

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Topics: Philanthropy, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Data Protection

EY: Building a better working world

Posted by Colleen Olphert, Director, Membership and Member Services on Jul 20, 2016 12:32:14 PM

The following is excerpted from Issue 15 of The Corporate Citizen. To learn more about how you can inform and improve your programs through stakeholder engagement, consider joining us for our course: Stakeholder Engagement: Identify, Prioritize, and Act.

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Topics: Stakeholder, Member Spotlight, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Engagement, Outcomes

Reporting on meaningful change

Posted by Katherine V. Smith, Executive Director on Jul 2, 2016 9:30:00 AM

GRI-ReportingonMeaningfulChange.jpgIn the past few years, it has become increasingly clear that the efforts of the public and private sectors are inextricably linked. To meet ambitious social and environmental targets like those outlined in the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), progress must be tracked and evaluated by all the estates and actors of society.

It is clear in contemporary society that most stakeholders see companies as the actors that have the resources, know-how, and efficiency to achieve the social and environmental improvements necessary to realize the SDGs and goals of the Paris Agreement.

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Topics: Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Sustainability Reporting, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)

Demonstrate your value through strategic measurement

Posted by Katherine V. Smith, Executive Director on Jun 1, 2016 10:15:46 AM

“I have been struck again and again by how important measurement is to improving the human condition.”—Bill Gates

When done right, corporate citizenship is a serious investment of money, resources, and time. To ensure that your CSR programs continue to receive the funding and attention they deserve, you must be able to demonstrate—to your leaders, your partners, and broader stakeholders—the return on that investment, or the ROI. What do your efforts offer the business? How do they advance the missions of your nonprofit partners? How are they benefiting your employees, customers, and shareholders? 

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Topics: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Impact Measurement, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Align, Return on Investment (ROI), Logic Model

The business case for healthy employees

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on May 25, 2016 9:01:36 AM

Wearable-Wellness-Tech-2-800x400.jpgHealthier employees are more productive and engaged in their work. They are less likely to call in sick or use vacation time for illnesses. They also perceive their companies as invested in their well-being and as more attractive places to work. However, the risks of an unhealthy workforce are as significant and numerous as the benefits of a healthy one.

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Topics: Engaging Employees, Health & Wellness, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Business Case

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Welcome to the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship blog, we are your resource for corporate citizenship insights, research, trending topics and executive education. Our blog is a place to exchange ideas and learn about corporate citizenship.

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