Corporate Citizenship Perspectives

Drivers of corporate citizenship: Resilience, responsibility, results.

Posted by Katherine V. Smith, Executive Director on Oct 2, 2017 11:52:03 AM

International-Corporate-Citizenship-Conference_Vertical.pngA few months ago, I wrote about the importance of operational resilience, and how corporate citizenship can play a role in helping companies survive and thrive. In order to compete and prosper over the long term—companies should do the work ahead of time that allows them to PASS through disruptions. To PASS, in short, is to:

Predict and prepare: Be proactive, not reactive.

Align your program with business strategy: Scan for risks, do what you can to avert them, and have a plan “B”.  

Sponsorship: Enlist groups across and beyond the organization to make sure that everyone knows their role and why it is important. 

Systems thinking: Consider technology systems, business processes, AND all of the people who interact with them.  How can you build flexibility and redundancy in the systems so that if one node in your network is compromised, you can continue to operate?

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Topics: Conference, Impact Measurement, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Disaster Relief, Participation

Driving a #GivingTuesday campaign: employee engagement, partnership and participation

Posted by Patricia MacKenzie, Director of Marketing & Communications on Oct 30, 2015 2:37:41 PM

 “We make a living by what we get but, we make a life by what we give.” - Winston Churchill

Giving Tuesday is a national day of online giving which is held at the start of the annual holiday season following Black Friday and Cyber Monday. #GivingTuesday celebrates and encourages charitable activities that support nonprofit organizations.

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Topics: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Partnerships, Engaging Employees, Giving, Strategy, Brand, Participation

Presenting Corporate Citizenship…

Posted by Nancy R. Dunbar, PhD on Nov 7, 2014 1:26:00 PM

Corporate-Citizenship-CommunicationsWhy do we invite speakers to address audiences for important occasions? Wouldn’t it be more efficient to communicate ideas in print?

If you were going to learn about an important initiative of your firm, would you prefer to receive a memo or to hear the news from a person? Why?

When you prepare a presentation outlining a corporate citizenship effort, how much time do you spend thinking about your delivery? Your voice? Your nonverbal communication? Your language? Your organization? Or do you think mostly about your message – the ideas, the “content”?

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Topics: Corporate Citizenship, Communication, Strategy, Participation

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The Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship is your resource for insights, research, trending topics, and executive education in the corporate citizenship field.

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