Corporate Citizenship Perspectives

3 ways corporate citizenship can improve brand and reputation

Every year, the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship gathers 600+ CSR professionals together for its annual International Corporate Citizenship Conference. Some of the most popular aspects of this three-day event are the numerous breakout sessions, where attendees can learn from expert panels, practical workshops, and in-depth case studies. This April in Los Angeles, the 2018 International Corporate Citizenship Conference—hosted by Travelers—will again feature 30 breakout sessions, and now is the best time to register, because for a limited time you SAVE $600 on registration!

Below is a recap of one of last year’s most popular sessions: Brand and reputation. You can find this story, and more, in our quarterly magazine, The Corporate Citizen.

BrandandRep.jpgThe interaction between a company’s bottom line, its environmental, social, and governance (ESG) efforts, and the way customers view both its product and its people is complex. Figuring out the right mix may be demanding at times. If you get it right, the rewards are more than worth the effort.

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Topics: Value of Corporate Citizenship, Reputation, Brand, Consumer, Intangible Assets

Creating CSR value with strong brand and reputation

View all resources on the Value of Corporate Citizenship >

“Reputation is what people expect us to do next. It is their expectation of the quality and character of the next thing we produce or say or do. We control our actions (even when it feels like we don't) and our actions over time (especially when we think no one is looking) earn our reputation.” – Seth Godin

Predictability is comforting. We like our daily routines, we wear the same jersey or sit in the same seat when our team plays, and we tend to remain loyal to the brands we like and trust. Unforseen events can shake our confidence in corporations, so companies spend a great deal of time preparing for the unexpected to ensure they consistently deliver on their brand promises. However, businesses today face a unique challenge in that most of their value is intangible, which must be protected and advanced in different ways.  

ComponentsofS&P.jpg

In the 1970s, a company’s market value was comprised of 83 percent tangible assets, things like the physical property, products, and machinery that the company owned. Only 17 percent of the market value of a company was made up of intangible assets, like intellectual property, human capital or reputation.[i]

Fast forward to the present day and the proportion has completely inverted. Only 16 percent of a company’s value is comprised of tangible assets, while 84 percent is made up of intangible assets (see Figure A).

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Topics: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Value of Corporate Citizenship, Reputation, Brand, Consumer, Intangible Assets, Market

eBay Giving Works helps people support the causes they care about through commerce

Posted by TSimpson on Jan 21, 2014 6:35:42 AM

EBAY_GivingWorks_vertA challenge that corporate citizenship practitioners often face is how to engage their customers in their citizenship activities. Developing these relationships can strengthen customer loyalty and contribute to a brand’s reputation. eBay, which provides a way for consumers to connect with cause through the eBay Giving Works platform and raise valuable funds for charity by buying and selling goods, has not only been successful in engaging customers in its giving programs, but has extended its reach to nonprofit organizations, brands, celebrities and the general public.

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Topics: Partnerships, Giving, Corporate Community Involvement, Non-Profits, Signature Programs, Consumer

Integrating environmental and social impacts into the bottom line: Dogeared’s story of attaining B Corporation certification

Posted by TSimpson on Oct 1, 2013 5:30:45 AM

Dogeared200x200As more and more companies try to connect their social and environmental impacts to the bottom line, measurement and accountability are becoming a standard. One of the ways to accomplish this is by formally accounting for your company’s environmental, social and governance (ESG) impacts and integrating those metrics into the company’s annual financial reports. Dogeared, Inc. decided to formally incorporate ESG standards and transparency into its business by becoming a Certified B Corporation. Given the growing community of B Corporations around the globe, the Center reached out to co-founder, Merlin Clarke, who explained the process of becoming a B Corporation and how it has impacted Dogeared’s corporate citizenship goals.

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Topics: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Engaging Employees, Integration, B Corp, Culture, Accountability, Impact, Consumer

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The Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship is your resource for insights, research, trending topics, and executive education in the corporate citizenship field.

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