Corporate Citizenship Perspectives

The business case for the Paris Agreement

Posted by Katherine V. Smith, Executive Director on Jun 5, 2017 12:15:31 PM

ClimateChange.jpgSince President Trump announced his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement, we have witnessed an unprecedented response from local, state, and corporate actors. In the subsequent 24 hours, dozens of companies—including Disney, General Motors, and Apple—and scores of state and local officials pledged continued commitment to the plan. Bloomberg founder and CEO Michael Bloomberg offered to contribute the $15 million dollars that the United States otherwise would have to the operating budget of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. In California, Governor Jerry Brown committed to continue talks with China to connect the country to the state’s cap and trade program, which is already linked to Quebec.

Read More

Topics: Corporate Citizenship, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), Business Case

Corporate responsibility + diversity & inclusion: an integrated approach to build a better working world

Diversity.jpgI recently had the pleasure of participating in a panel discussion as part of the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship 2017 International Corporate Citizenship Conference. Phyllis A. James, executive vice president and chief diversity and corporate responsibility officer at MGM Resorts International, moderated the conversation, which also included Jack Bergen, vice president of corporate projects at Arconic, and Caroline Chambers, vice president and diversity programs manager at Comerica Bank. Together, we explored how an integrated approach to corporate responsibility and diversity and inclusiveness can help achieve business goals.

Read More

Topics: Diversity, Corporate Community Involvement, Business Case, Inclusion, Skills-based Volunteering

The business case for youth mentoring

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on Sep 28, 2016 8:00:00 AM

In the United States, approximately 5.6 million youth between the ages of 16 and 24 are disconnected from school and work, and many are not getting the support they need to drive greater engagement. One in three young people— nearly 16 million— will reach the age of 19 without having ever had a mentor in their life of any kind. These rates are even higher for at-risk youth, who experience higher rates of poverty, limited networks, and under-resourced schools.[1] Research shows that even one positive, consistent, caring, relationship with an adult can offset nearly every risk factor in a young person’s life and improve their chances of success.

Today, companies of all sizes are recognizing the role they can play in filling this “mentorship gap” and have simultaneously discovered that they can use mentorship programs to realize both business and corporate responsibility goals. According to the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship’s most recent Community Involvement Study, companies consistently rank youth programs as one of the most important social issues addressed through their community involvement efforts (See Figure A).

Mentoring_Figure_A.jpg

Read More

Topics: Management, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Business Case, Youth, Return on Investment (ROI)

The business case for healthy employees

Posted by Stewart Rassier, Director of Executive Education on May 25, 2016 9:01:36 AM

Wearable-Wellness-Tech-2-800x400.jpgHealthier employees are more productive and engaged in their work. They are less likely to call in sick or use vacation time for illnesses. They also perceive their companies as invested in their well-being and as more attractive places to work. However, the risks of an unhealthy workforce are as significant and numerous as the benefits of a healthy one.

Read More

Topics: Engaging Employees, Health & Wellness, Value of Corporate Citizenship, Business Case

From the corner office: perspectives on corporate citizenship

Posted by Katherine V. Smith, Executive Director on Jun 8, 2015 11:05:00 AM
The following is excerpted from the most recent issue of The Corporate Citizen, the Center’s magazine.

Business leaders are aware of the increasingly significant role that corporate citizenship can play in overall business strategy, and how—if effectively aligned—investments can improve performance.

state-of-corporate-citizenship-future-business-focus

According to the Center’s 2014 State of Corporate Citizenship study, the majority of executive respondents view corporate citizenship as a way to achieve strategic corporate goals and they expect its importance to increase in the future. In fact, for the first time in the decade that the Center has conducted the study, the majority of executives anticipate resources for every corporate citizenship dimension to increase over the next three years.

Read More

Topics: Corporate Citizenship, Responsible Corporate Leadership, Business Case, Executive

Research shows doing good is good for you

Posted by Paige Kelly on Oct 23, 2013 1:38:02 PM

UnitedHealthIt is generally accepted that volunteering is a good thing to do and a common method by which members of a society helps those most in need. But is it true volunteering also benefits the volunteer? UnitedHealth Group wanted to look into this phenomenon further so they decided to conduct a comprehensive survey and analysis on what effect volunteering has on an individual. Carol Simon and Kate Rubin from UnitedHealth led our recent Webinar, Doing Good is Good for You, relaying findings from their 2013 Health and Volunteering Study which supports the positive effects employees and employers receive from volunteering.

Read More

Topics: Engaging Employees, Volunteer, Health & Wellness, Business Case, Survey

Corporate citizenship success hinges on support from senior executives

Posted by Katherine V. Smith, Executive Director on Jul 10, 2013 10:04:26 AM

Recent research by the Center and others continues to show that support from the top of a firm is essential to the success of your corporate citizenship programs. Securing buy-in from senior executives goes a long way toward integrating corporate citizenship across an organization and demonstrating how it can align with business strategy.

In our most recent signature research report, Profile of the Professionals 2013, survey respondents at middle- and senior-level positions cite a lack of top management buy-in among the greatest challenges they face when trying to implement corporate citizenship programs.

Read More

Topics: Responsible Corporate Leadership, Strategy, Business Case, Executive, Buy-in