Corporate Citizenship Perspectives

Katherine Duceman, Senior Education Advisory and Member Services Associate

Recent Posts

Modern Slavery: Driving solutions to detect and eliminate human rights abuse in supply chains

 Slavery_SupplyChainManagement.jpegToday, leading companies understand that they must look beyond their own operations when assessing and addressing their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) impacts. To deliver maximum business and social returns, they should consider and incorporate their supply chains when developing corporate citizenship programs.

Those that do are presented with the opportunity to address inefficiencies and risks—many of which could have severe ramifications to a firm’s reputation, as research finds that consumers are likely to hold a firm responsible for unsustainable activity regardless of where it occurs within the supply chain. A 2014 study finds that, while the severity of the incident increases backlash, the relationship the supplier has to the firm (direct vs. indirect) and the importance of the supplied product in no way mediates consumer anger.[i] That means that the behaviors of even a supplier that makes a negligible part of a product could pose a serious threat to company reputation and profit.

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Topics: Supply Chain Management

Supporting veterans and their families with corporate citizenship efforts

Veterans.jpgCorporate citizenship initiatives focused on veteran hiring and engagement are becoming increasingly popular because they provide a win-win situation for companies and military families alike: Veterans provide companies with valuable transferable skills and consistently prove to be dependable and hardworking team players, while companies provide veterans with the stability and purpose to help their families thrive.

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Topics: Corporate Community Involvement